By halifaxwebcam January 17, 2014 Leave a Comment
Photo credit here.

Photo credit here.

A group of migrant youth, including 17 year old Diego Cardona, a participant of a group of refugee and migrant students known as the Fresh Voices Youth Advisory Team, is calling on the B.C. Ministry of Education to provide students credit for learning English; it only seems fair due to the fact that native English speaking students get credit for learning a foreign language. The reasons for this division of student considerations are unknown, it may be because some feel that English is the easiest language to learn, but the same has been said about Latin, Italian and French; learning the German language can take longer because it’s so complex.
 
Under British Columbia’s current system, students attending English Language Learning (EEL) courses (previously called English as a Second Language (ESL) courses, aren’t given school credits for taking the class. In today’s world of cultural convergence, it’s hard to believe that a system that seems to reek of inequality should still be in place.
 
It’s a matter of fairness says Colombian-born Cardona, who attends Sir Winston Churchill Secondary, stating that what he and the group are trying to address is the equality issue. The fact is that these students work just as hard, and put in just as much effort to learn a language as the English students do, so they should receive the same benefit of getting credit. According to the group’s petition, migrant students typically graduate later than their English speaking equivalents because of the lack of credit for ELL courses and they’ll have to make up the credit elsewhere.

 

17 year old Cardona feels it is time for this old school policy to change so the students can finally transition into the system that is equal for all. Instead of being required to make up 60 to 70 credits EEL students would only have to achieve the mandatory 20 credits; the same as the English speaking students.

In 2011 the EEL’s student group started getting together with the assistance of Canada’s Vancouver Foundation, an organization that focuses on community improvement. In late 2013 the group published an online report comprising a variety of suggestions for the Ministry of Education, well thought out recommendations made by migrant students. The Vancouver Foundation is currently endeavoring to facilitate a conversation between the migrant students and the B.C. Ministry of Education.

 

President and CEO of the foundation have said that their hope is that the immigrant students and the ministry can have a well informed conversation based on all the groundwork. In the meantime the motivated Youth Advisory Team plans on continuing to gather online signatures and they plan on presenting the petition to the Ministry of Education.

It is hoped that some time in the future migrant students won’t end up having to graduate later than their English speaking fellow students. In today’s world of cultural convergence it’s only fair that every student learning a language should be treated equal; hopefully the ministry to see the current injustice in the system and make a much needed change.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Copyright © 2017 Halifax Webcams All Rights Reserved.